Wednesday, August 31, 2011

Reflecting on Italy and some older works

2008 piece, View from La Rondanai, plein air. Learned some difficult things on this one.
2008 piece, Taking Leave, plein air with Dawn's encouragement.
2008 piece, Paolo's Bano, plein air with Toni Hooper while Paolo skinny dipped (some of you know this story.)


2008 piece, Umbrian Greens, plein air following our move to the tiny borgo of Eggi near Spoleto.


Three years ago today, Mark and I began our 8-month stay in Italy. (Follow this link to stories about our trip.) We started by spending 2 months in a little town on the Adriatic coast called Peschici.  It is right on the spur before you head down into the heel of the boot, and our lovely home, La Rondinaia, sat on cliff's edge with views of both sunrise and sunset over the sea. Sometimes we still cannot believe we did it. I've been thinking a lot about Peschici lately and missing the wonderful people we met there. We never dreamed we would go so many years without returning.

As most of you probably know by now, we sold our house in Tennessee and all of our belongings to make the trip. It was to be a trip of a life-time, with the sole intention of my painting purely for artistic growth (as opposed to producing works for exhibits and galleries). It was a lot of pressure to put on myself, knowing that we were investing everything we had in "me." But in such economic times, it seemed as good a thing to invest in as any.

Taking this work very seriously, I painted day after day in the Puglian sun... experimenting, failing, and falling flat on every piece. It was terribly frustrating. We had given so much and come so far and I was constantly disappointing myself at every turn. Looking back on it, of course, I can see that it was difficult artistic growth (the very thing I had come for) that was making my life so difficult in this paradise.

About this time, my friend Dawn Whitelaw came over for a visit. Any of you who have ever met her know that giving up is simply not an option. Her encouragement and determination was exactly the fuel I needed.

Dawn's visit along with other visits from artist friends Toni Hooper and, once we moved to Umbria, Cynthia Vowell, inspired me beyond expression. So, was it the location and setting of Italy that prompted growth? Was it the fact that I had less pressure to "produce a specific product?" Or was it the help and advice of great friends? Probably a combination of all of these things (plus some really great food and wine)! I am still growing from that experience and the hundreds of others that have happened since. That's the thing about this job. As long as we are open to challenges and willing to work hard, we will never grow tired or bored or complacent.

Set yourself a goal. Do what it takes to reach it!

Looking to visit Peschici? I am currently planning a workshop there for 2013! Let me know if you are interested.

5 comments:

Kath Schifano said...

I anonymously followed your Italy trip through your posts and IPAP, always amazed at your audacity!

Now that we have met in the Adirondacks I know that you are a regular painter/person like the rest of us, just a bit braver than I to take that big step. Bravo.

Barbara said...

I love this post, Lori. It was very encouraging to me. This profession can be exhilirating and unbelievably joyful and be downright frustrating and lonely. I read Claude Monet's quote recently, "Color is my day-long obsession, joy and torment" and I couldn't agree more! Thanks for the encouragement to persevere today!

Neveah said...

Thanks for this post - great inspiration!

Celeste Bergin said...

Another great post! So informative and generous...and that bit at the end about "staying the course"...pure gold. I like you. You are an artist's artist.

Roxanne Steed said...

So glad to have stumbled across this post. I found it very inspiring- and yes, there are those times when I need to be reminded to 'hang in there'!